My P&G Story #16: The last thing you should tell a creative

My P&G Story #16: The last thing you should tell a creative

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #16: The last thing you should tell a creative

I was training a big group of newly recruited P&G marketers. Paco was one of them. Fresh-faced-straight-out-of-university, exceptionally sharp and incredibly outspoken.

As part of the week-long training, we spent a day at one of the world’s best creative agencies. The objective was to inspire and educate the new marketers on building collaborative, long-lasting relationships with their creative teams.

The day included interactive sessions with the agency’s top creatives. Nick was one of them. In-advertising-since-he-could-remember, exceptionally inspiring and incredibly proud of his work. It had taken a lot of negotiation to find an hour in Nick’s packed calendar and we were lucky to have him.

Nick showed us his favourite advertising campaign, the one that had consumed him day and night, that had stretched him beyond imagination and had ultimately made his career. “This is my life’s work,” he proclaimed as he played the TV ad on the big screen. He was trembling and glowing even though this must have been the thousandth time he was watching it.

 

The ad finished. This would have been the moment where I thanked Nick for sharing his work and and asked the group to respond using the feedback framework I had taught them earlier.

But this moment never came because it was interrupted by another moment. The moment when Paco raised his hand and simultaneously shouted “It’s shit!”

 

Silence.

 

Red cheeks.

 

Bulging eyes.

 

I tried my best to rescue the situation. “What Paco is challenging is whether the campaign delivers against the brand objectives…” But the damage was done and no amount of rationalizing could repair Nick’s broken pride.

 

After the session, I gave Paco some feedback, using the framework to set an example.

The feedback framework:

1. Acknowledge the good; 2. Highlight improvement areas; 3. Engage on next steps.

“It’s fantastic that you are so engaged in these sessions. However, your feedback needs to come from the perspective of the brand audience, rather than your personal opinion. Now how do you think it’s best to manage this situation?”

 

Needless to say, Nick was unavailable for all future training we organized. We lost our most inspirational presenter but we did learn how not to build collaborative, long-lasting relationships with creatives. Looking back at our less experienced days, Paco and I laugh as we recount this story.

 

Sometimes we learn more from getting stuck than from getting unstuck. So go ahead, embrace the stickiness.

 

Can’t see the silver lining? Coaching helps you see the bigger picture and unpack the learning from every challenge. Book your free consultation to explore how.

 

 

Photo by Groucho Marx

My P&G Story #15: How to inspire without a big budget

My P&G Story #15: How to inspire without a big budget

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #15: How to inspire without a big budget

I was briefing the creative agencies on our latest Herbal Essences campaign – ‘tame the wild’. How could I inspire them without a big budget?

 

The P&G office, as bright and spacious as it was, wasn’t exactly ‘wild’. Agency briefs usually looked like this: a room so small that people’s elbows were touching and bags were stuffed under the table; a long powerpoint presentation with at least 20 slides borrowed from the previous long powerpoint presentation; an attempt to uplift the mood and get the creative juices flowing 3 hours later just as a colleague is knocking on the door and reminding us to vacate the room because they have it booked.

I got bored just thinking about starting to plan another one of these briefing sessions. I fantasized about doing something big and exciting like taking the team on safari (to tame their wild, unruly hair, like in the TV ad). As you can imagine, such extravaganza was not included in the budget and I wanted to stay friends with the finance manager. It is always a good idea to be friends with the finance manager.

 

Since I couldn’t take my team on safari (but I would encourage you to do it if you get the chance), I brought the safari to the office. I booked the most spacious room in the building. I dressed it up like the African savannah, with shrubs and reds and yellows. Drum beats played in the background. The team wowed as they walked through the door. We sat on big cushions on the floor, around a ‘campfire’. The brief still contained the required information like pack size and product benefit but I weaved these details into a story, like the ones you tell around campfires. It was colorful. It was interactive. No one wanted to leave the room.

The team’s excitement translated into tangible results. The local marketing plan they proposed was wildly creative. There were elements we had never done before, like festivals and beauty trucks. We had a lot of fun whilst driving the business.

– – –

 Reflecting back on this experience, it strikes me how quickly we grow out of child play and banish imagination to the unprofessional, not-results-focused-enough corner. We think that because we’re in a big, serious company, we need to act all big and serious to get stuff done. We mask the childish spirit with percentages and suits and complicated words. But I believe that, deep inside, this spirit remains and it takes any opportunity to manifest itself. Like when big and serious people unexpectedly walk into a makeshift African savannah in the middle of the office.

 

Get unstuck by flipping the situation. If you can’t take your team on safari, bring the safari to them.

 

Want to do something creative but don’t have the money? Coaching challenges your assumptions and helps you identify opportunities you never even considered. Begin by booking your free consultation now.

 

 

My P&G Story #14: How I made stewardship sexy

My P&G Story #14: How I made stewardship sexy

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #14: How I made stewardship sexy

“I have an ‘opportunity’ for you,” said Jim, my manager.

Translation: I have a horrible project that no one else wants to do and I’m going to speak in a high-pitched, excited voice in order to make you think you’re the luckiest person in the company who has been chosen to do it.

This was early on in my career so I was genuinely excited and curious. I am genuinely excited and curious about most things in life, but this was coming from my manager so it had to be big.

“We need someone to lead the stewardship team, to teach marketers how to plan and balance their budgets. It’s a big responsibility – it can save the company millions of dollars – and you have the right skills for it.”

 

He was asking me to be the Budget Police. No marketer likes the Budget Police. I would spend the rest of my P&G career having lunch alone, staring out of the cafeteria window to avoid angry glances from colleagues passing by.

I protested but Jim was insistent and he was my manager. I didn’t want him to think I wasn’t up for a challenge but I also didn’t want to be stuck with a tedious project. I offered a deal:

 

“I will take the stewardship project only if I can think of a way to make it fun.”

 

Jim agreed and I began my assessment. I gathered the facts:

  • Each brand manager had to spend their brand budget within +/-0.5%
  • This seemed like an insignificant margin but it added up to millions of dollars
  • For the past three years, the marketing spend had come significantly under or over budget; both were equally bad because what the company needed was stability

Like a true marketer, I asked myself why? What was holding these intelligent, hard-working people back? To get a deeper understanding, I held focus groups. The methodology was very robust and included corridor chats and eavesdropping on people’s rants about stewardship.

The insights I uncovered:

  • Marketers were afraid of looking at their budgets because what if they found a big mess or mistake?
  • They didn’t know where to start with managing the budgets because there were so many rules and they were bombarded with things to do
  • They felt stewardship was an ungrateful job because they only ever got punished for doing badly but never rewarded for doing well

As a result, they were putting off proper budget work for months… sometimes until the end of the fiscal year when it was too late. I say proper because the company had multiple budget reviews but these focused on the topline and marketers were trusted to do the more detailed and dirty work in their own time.

What was needed wasn’t more budget policing but instead more budget fun. I could do fun, even if it was stewardship related, and so I jumped right in.

 

I worked with the corporate finance experts to revolutionize the way we taught stewardship to marketers. This involved some mindset changes that led to behavioral changes.

 

The opposite of scary is sexy

I transformed the tone of voice and the look and feel of all stewardship communication. Presentation cover slides became a picture of attractive celebrities discussing the importance of getting the numbers right. Email subject lines started with ‘Stewardship is Sexy…’ Curiosity engages people. The marketers were surprised by the fresh attitude to budgets and hence opened up for a dialogue on the topic. They opened the emails. They turned up to the training sessions. This alone wasn’t going to sort out the budgets, but it made stewardship more approachable and that was a great start.

 

One step at a time

I locked myself into a room with the finance team for several hours and mapped out every action that had to take place throughout the year in order to balance the budgets. We designed bite-size communication that contained just one call to action at a time. Now marketers were not only opening our emails, they were actually reading them and taking action. What we were asking them to do was the same as before, but they perceived it as simpler.

 

The reward for being a nerd doesn’t have to be nerdy

No ‘stewardship excellence’ award, even if it’s embossed with gold and presented in front of the whole company is going to appeal to a marketer. Just because people do nerdy work (budgets are considered nerdy by marketers and most humans – ask around if you don’t believe me), it doesn’t mean they want to be known for it. Our prize was a bottle of real champagne for the best results, presented only in front of peers. I’ve never had so many people coming up to me and asking ‘how can I get one too?’ Our dialogue kept going…

Side note on push backs

I don’t want to leave you with an illusion that this process was a walk in the park. There were many obstacles. My favourite one was when I got a cautionary email from the finance director stressing that stewardship was not a joke and sexy visuals and words were utterly inappropriate. I thought I might get fired. Thankfully we had some early indications that the interventions are working so they turned a blind eye on my unconventional methods.

The results

Whilst everyone didn’t get a bottle of champagne, they did a pretty good job with their budgets. The company-level marketing spend was within target for the first time in three years. This was a happy end and the beginning of a new way of teaching stewardship to marketers – unconventional but highly effective. Oh, and the best part was, I had delivered on my commitment and so I negotiated my release from this project.

  

Get unstuck by bringing fun to a serious project. Humans will resist an unconventional method but no one can deny the great results it produces.

 

Feeling drained and uninspired? Coaching helps you explore different perspectives, including how to lighten up a difficult situation. Brighten up your day by booking your free consultation now.

Looking forward to connecting,

My P&G Story #13: Superdrug & the inflatable kangaroos

My P&G Story #13: Superdrug & the inflatable kangaroos

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #13: Superdrug & the inflatable kangaroos

My very first day at P&G. I dressed up for it. Over-dressed, in fact (P&G had a fairly relaxed dress code but of course I didn’t know this at the time). I was smart and ready for this job and I was going to make an impression!

 

I was working on Aussie hair care, the coolest* brand in the building (*all marketers secretly believed this, even if they stood up for their own brands). My team took me through my very detailed work plan. The most urgent and important project at the time was the Superdrug in-store plan for Australia Day. They said it was all about incremental display, in-store execution, return on investment, customer collaboration…and Aussifying the stores. I kept nodding, but to be honest I was a little overwhelmed – my theoretical marketing classes had not prepared me for this.

 

The only thing I truly understood was that I had to get a bunch of inflatable kangaroos into Superdrug stores on 26 January. Delivering brilliantly and on time is a big value for me, so I clung onto this concrete deliverable like my life depended on it.

 

 

The problem was, no one else’s life seemed to depend on these inflatable kangaroos. Procurement had strict criteria on what kind of plastics were deemed safe for consumers – 99% were not. The supplier would take a few extra weeks to deliver because of Chinese New Year (how unlucky was this?!). To top it all off, the P&G account manager went on holiday during the most critical time when we had to decide on the size of the kangaroos! How was this allowed!?

 

As a responsible individual, and one that would not fail on her first project at her first job, I took matters into my own hands. I called the Superdrug buyer directly. I had never met her, or even spoken to her before. The conversation went something like this:

 

“Hello, my name is Desi and I work on Aussie. We need your urgent approval on the inflatable kangaroos for the in-store event.”

 

I could practically hear the confusion in her silence. I thought I better explain the severe consequences of delaying the approval.

 

“If we don’t get the approval today, we will miss the delivery because the lead time is longer because it’s Chinese New Year and then [my own version of ‘the incremental display, in-store execution, return on investment and Aussifying the stores’] will be ruined!”

 

Still confused and possibly slightly amused or perhaps angry, the buyer relented “Let me see what I can do.”

 

 

Yes, inflatable kangaroos exist. And yes, they must wear a seatbelt in my car.

 

 

The inflatable kangaroos made it in-store on time and the event delivered excellent results. I was proud and excited and felt all the hard work and stress was worth it. Once I had some time to cool down, the account manager invited me for a coffee and a s**t sandwich. In case you haven’t heard this expression before, it’s basically giving bad feedback sandwiched between two positive things, to soften the blow:

 

He said he had never seen anyone so fierce and determined to deliver a project. Oh, and by the way, the inflatable kangaroos were just a small executional detail amongst many other factors that made the in-store event a success. Now keep up the great work and positive spirit!

 

Was he saying I had pestered the Superdrug buyer and obsessed over some inflatable kangaroos that didn’t even matter? Yes, that’s exactly what he was saying.

 

The results were good so I let it pass. But I did learn a valuable lesson for my next in-store executions: inflatable kangaroos are optional.

 

 

Get unstuck by zooming out and looking at the big picture. What are the critical factors that will make or break your project?

 

Feel like you’re wasting energy on small things? Coaching helps you identify the critical factors and do work that matters. The first critical factor for coaching is booking your free consultation.

My P&G Story #12: What’s your dream job?

My P&G Story #12: What’s your dream job?

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #12: What’s your dream job?

A new manager had joined our team. He knew we felt uninspired. On his first day, he took us out of the office for lunch (yes, it’s possible even when you work in an industrial estate with noisy trucks and dusty warehouses).

 

We had prepared a business summary and expected questions like “How can you drive double digit growth this year?” We were surprised when our new manager didn’t mention a word about business and instead was curious about our lives:

 

“If you weren’t working here and you could do anything, what would you be doing?”

 

No one in the company had ever asked us this question. There was an unspoken taboo on sharing ambitions for work and life beyond P&G. What if the company doubted our commitment and stopped supporting us?

 

The taboo was broken. Our manager shared his dreams and we shared ours. We got to know the human element of our each other, the one that had been hiding behind name badges and job titles.

 

Each time we reviewed my work plan, he would ask:

 

“How will this [possibly not very exciting] project contribute to your future ambitions?”

 

He reframed even the most mundane projects as an investment in my dream career. I still didn’t love my job, but now it had a higher purpose – I was learning skills that would be helpful later, I was overcoming challenges and becoming more resilient. As a result, I respected my manager and worked twice as hard for him.

 

Get unstuck by setting a higher purpose for your work. Besides not getting fired, how is delivering brilliant work helping you develop?

 

Are you stuck in a boring and meaningless job that you just have to do right now? Coaching can help you make the most of it by connecting it to your overall purpose. Explore how by booking your free consultation now.

Photo credit: Kuramathi

My P&G Story #11: The 3 unexpected benefits of my sabbatical

My P&G Story #11: The 3 unexpected benefits of my sabbatical

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #11: The 3 unexpected benefits of my sabbatical

I had decided to leave my safe, well-paid corporate job and I thought:

 

“I might as well take a sabbatical now. Who knows when the next possibility might arise?”

 

Like most people, I wanted to take a break, to do a bit of travel and spend time with my family.

Unlike most people, I didn’t want to launch a business, ‘find myself’ or learn something new. Instead, I wanted to forget about work, to lose myself and to unlearn some of what I had spent the last 7 years learning at P&G. Mostly, I wanted to do absolutely nothing at all. This change of pace brought about some unexpected benefits.

 

BENEFIT 1: I GOT MY FIRST CLIENT

HOW I GOT IT:

I completely stopped talking about work. It was tough – everyone wanted to know why I had left P&G and what I was going to do next. It was really tempting to share my dreams, to analyze my fears, to recall each step of my journey. But I stayed strong and didn’t indulge them. Eventually I relaxed and started living in the moment. I was surprised how much there was right here, right now. The magic lay in the balance between my P&G past and my training and development future. I relaxed and opened up and when, out of the blue, a man from Bahrain asked me to become his coach, I accepted the opportunity.

I got my first client by living in the here and now.

 

BENEFIT 2: I DISCOVERED THE ‘BEING’ MODE

HOW IT GOT IT:

For a whole month, I did nothing. I stopped planning. I didn’t invite friends out. I didn’t go to yoga. I just woke up and let the day unfold. After seven years in a demanding and dynamic job, doing nothing was not just difficult, it was horrifying. I had nothing to accomplish and therefore no way to justify my existence. When I completely stopped doing stuff, I thought there would be nothing left. But there was. It was called ‘being’ and it had been there all along, buried under deadlines and often useless actions.

‘Being’ allowed me to be proud of who I was inside. It was a welcome break from having to prove myself by constantly ‘doing’. Now I can choose which mode I want to be in and switch when I need a change of perspective.

I discovered ‘being’ by intentionally pausing ‘doing’.

 

BENEFIT 3: I GOT MY CONFIDENCE BACK

HOW I GOT IT:

I had joined P&G straight out of university. The company was all I knew of the working world. It was P&G that taught me the principles-based thinking by which I operate to this day. It was P&G that equipped me with the one-page template which I still use. It was at P&G that I met some of my best friends.

During my sabbatical, I actively un-learnt the P&G ways. I sought different perspectives. I ripped off the ‘P&Ger’ label and tried the opposite of everything I used to do. I played being the opposite of who I used to be. I remembered who I was before I started work. I reconnected with my natural strengths, some of which had been suppressed because they didn’t fit with the corporate values.

Then I put both sides of me together – the P&G lessons, skill and experience and my natural talents and values. A new confidence emerged – one that was stronger and not limited to one organization.

I got my confidence back by separating my identity from my job.

 

Looking back, I realize I don’t have to wait for a sabbatical to experience these benefits again:

  • I choose to live in the here and now. Daily meditation helps me with this.
  • When things start to get out of control, I intentionally stop ‘doing’ and switch to ‘being’. Asking myself “Who am I being in the face of this challenge?” usually does the trick.
  • Whilst my personality is a big part of my work as a coach, I constantly remind myself that I am not my job. I haven’t fully mastered this, but I am working on it.

 

If you were taking a sabbatical now, what benefits would you like to experience?

How can you get these benefits whilst working?

My P&G Story #10: How I got my confidence back

My P&G Story #10: How I got my confidence back

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #10: How I got my confidence back

People are often surprised to hear that I became more confident after leaving P&G. Didn’t I feel prouder saying “I work for P&G” than “I work for [some unknown] company”? At first I did, but during my sabbatical I discovered that true confidence doesn’t come from the organization I work for, no matter how supportive that organization it may be.

 

There were many awkward moments during my post-P&G sabbatical. The most awkward (and frustratingly, the most frequent) one was introducing myself. I could no longer use my usual line “I’m Desi, I work for P&G”, so instead I said:

 

“I’m Desi, I used to work for P&G.”

 

For the past seven years, I had been a ‘P&Ger’. Leaving the company had left a big gap in my identity. It was like jumping out of the mother ship and floating silently away, stuck in space yet belonging nowhere.

One day, whilst waiting at the bus stop, I heard a small child proclaim “I am Alexander.” And I that’s when it struck me. Children don’t put their life on hold, waiting to join a company so they can finally receive an identity. They live with the identity they already have, the one they got at birth.

But surely such simple introductions were for kids. I was, after all, supposed to be an adult. For the next week, I put my adult status on hold and experimented with a child-like introduction:

 

“I’m Desi.”

(*holding breath*)

 

90% of people didn’t even ask me where I worked. This opened up space for other topics – like the countries where I had lived, my Ashtanga yoga practice and my upcoming holiday. I began to recognize the values that underpinned my identity – freedom, discovery, perseverance. I realized I was still living these values even outside of P&G. The company, therefore, had been a contributor to my identity – rather than being my identity.

This liberating thought led me through a process of letting go:

  1. I acknowledged P&G’s contribution to my life – it had taught me about marketing, business and developing people.
  2. I was grateful to have started my career in one of the best companies in the world.
  3. Finally, I peeled off the P&G label and separated myself from the company.

 

Redefining my identity as internal rather than external gave me a new air of confidence. This confidence was stronger because it depended only on me and my choices, rather than on other people or organizations. It took me a long time to get this confidence and now that I felt its benefits, I vowed to never let it go.

 

Get unstuck by peeling off the labels. Who are you, at your core?

 

What labels are you sticking on yourself? Coaching helps you uncover your true self and (re)gain confidence. Discover how by booking your free consultation now.

My P&G Story #9: When I let my team member go

My P&G Story #9: When I let my team member go

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #9: When I let my team member go

I was recruiting team members to deliver a new hire training. Ana was perfect for the job – enthusiastic and with a quirky perspective. When I asked her to join the team, she was thrilled and committed right away. Job done, I thought.

I was wrong. Despite her initial eagerness, Ana was impossible to pin down. She dropped out of meetings in the last minute, didn’t deliver the work we had agreed and generally wasn’t taking the lead on her project. Her excuses were varied:

 

“My manager asked me to meet at this time”

“I have a big deadline tomorrow”

“Once I’m back from holiday, I’ll get started on it…”

 

I didn’t want to appear inflexible, so I adapted our team meetings around her. I also didn’t want to seem pushy, so I had a few friendly chats with her and reminded her of the importance of delivering on time. I was cautious this could set the wrong example for the rest of the team, but I reassured myself it was a one-off.

 

Ana still wasn’t delivering and I found myself rationalizing on her behalf. That’s when I realized all the excuses came down to one simple fact: the new hire training was low on Ana’s priorities; so low in fact, it was about to fall off the paper. I was stuck between maintaining the relationship with my colleague and getting the work done.

 

I asked myself:

 

“What is the most important factor in delivering this project?”

 

From all my years of leading the training team, I knew the answer was dedication. Whilst Ana was smart and generally hard working, she was not dedicated to our project.

Keeping her on the team wasn’t fair to the new hires who deserved the best training. It also wasn’t fair to the rest of the team who would have to pick up her slack in the last minute. It was going to be a difficult conversation but I knew I had to do it.

 

“Ana, how are you feeling about the new hire training?”

“Well, I like the project but I am overwhelmed right now.”

“Alright, so what would help you?”

“Hmm… maybe I can step out for now and join the team in a few months when I have more time?”

“I think dropping this project is the right thing for you so you can concentrate on your top priorities. It is also the right thing for our team because we need everyone giving 110%.”

 

I had feared Ana would be upset when I let her go. Instead, she was relieved – and so was I. My team had to do a bit of extra work to compensate for her absence, but we had more than enough time – and dedication – to do it.

 

Get unstuck by aligning your priorities with your team. If they don’t match, the work won’t get done on time, well, or at all.

 

Feeling overwhelmed by your to-do list? Coaching helps you to identify what’s most important and to focus on it without feeling guilty about the other stuff. Prioritize yourself by today booking your free consultation.

 

My P&G Story #8: Now is perfect and perfect is now

My P&G Story #8: Now is perfect and perfect is now

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #8: Now is perfect and perfect is now

Just a year after I started working at P&G, I was asked to join the team that trains the new marketers. Me? But I’m quite new and still learning myself. On the day of the training, I was really nervous. I didn’t want to make a fool of myself. My colleague nudged me over to the front of the room. All eyes were on me. What could I possibly teach these new hires?

 

Quite a lot, it turned out.

 

I may have only known a little bit about marketing, but they knew even less. I delivered some of the best-scoring training and – once I managed to shake off the nerves – I had a lot of fun. This was the beginning of my people development career. Looking back now, I wonder when this beginning would have happened if I had waited for the ‘perfect’ moment to train the new hires.

 

Get unstuck by jumping straight in. You’ll never be 100% ready so what are you waiting for?

 

Are you waiting for the ‘perfect’ moment? Coaching can give you the confidence to go for the opportunity. Jump straight in by booking your free consultation now.

 

My P&G Story #7: They took my idea and ran

My P&G Story #7: They took my idea and ran

Desi Jagger's Blog

My P&G Story #7: They took my idea and ran

I have a confession to make. I usually write my stories about how I get unstuck in work and life. But today is different. Today I have an unresolved story and I would like to hear your advice on how to get unstuck.

This is a very old story which bubbled to the surface as I was listening to this Fizzle podcast about the difference between stealing and borrowing ideas. Essentially, stealing is replicating something and pretending it’s yours. Borrowing, on the other hand, is building on a concept whilst crediting the original author.

 

The brand I was working on had gone stale. We treated each product line as a separate entity, which was confusing for consumers and inefficient to manage internally. We needed a new mindset altogether, not executional tweaks. I proposed a portfolio strategy to manage the brand as one entity, leveraging the different product lines in a way that linked together and made sense to consumers.

I shared my portfolio strategy with my manager who appreciated the fresh thinking and said she would discuss it with our director. Many drafts and iterations later, I presented it to the regional team and they were impressed. I was proud and excited…

 

…until the regional deployment day. Connected via video conference, the local teams (mine included) watched eagerly as the regional team deployed their new strategy.

It was pretty much a copy of mine. The same table. The same words.

 

At first I was glowing – my work had become the new regional standard! I impatiently awaited the moment when they would mention this thinking came from me and my team. But this moment never came. My team shook their heads in dismay. But not a single one of them, not even my manager, said a word during the meeting.

 

When I shared my frustration with my manager, her response was vague: “the right people know the work you’ve done.” When I asked for her support to rectify the situation and get me the recognition I deserved, she labeled me ungrateful and immature:

“You should be happy that your work will make an impact on the whole of Europe. So what if your name isn’t on it?”

I was sure that the lack of acknowledgement did not come from bad intentions. As people contributed to the idea, everyone felt involved. This was the kind of project that created reputations and that led to career advancement. After months of hard work and mind-stretching, I watched the promised rewards evaporate into thin air.

 

I was stuck between the pride of standing up for myself and the fear of being judgedShould I politely ask the regional team to acknowledge the work came from me? What if I air my frustration with our director? Would it be childish to send an email telling everyone this was my idea?

In the end I did nothing.

As a result, I got no credit for my work. I didn’t become famous and my career certainly didn’t advance on the back of it. Instead, I cultivated a regret which still consumes me today. So I reach out for your advice:

 

How should I have gotten unstuck in this situation?